holy trinity sundayOver the years, catechists, teachers, and parents have used images and objects to convey the mystery and reality of the Most Holy Trinity. Some use a three-leaf clover, with the three petals united into one. Another image some use is that of coffee, with cream and sugar added; three distinct items but one cup of coffee. I would often gaze at a beautiful tree behind my house and ponder and reflect on one large branch that was divided into three segments, reminding me of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

But none of these images really reflect the reality of the Most Holy Trinity, three distinct Persons in one God. A mystery for us, yes, but also a reality.  “The love of God has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.” (From the second reading of this solemnity, the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans, Chapter 5: verses 1-5.)

The Prayer After Communion asks God to “bring us health in body and soul, as we confess your eternal holy Trinity and undivided Unity.” Words heard at Mass throughout the world for this great solemnity.

Yet our world today, our country, and even our cities are divided; divided between the rich and the poor, those who live in beautiful homes and those who are homeless, those who have well-paying jobs and those struggling to make ends meet since they earn minimum wage.

The second reading from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Romans, reminds us that “affliction produces endurance, and endurance, proven character, and proven character, hope and hope does not disappoint because the love of God has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.

In Vatican News, the newspaper quotes St. Augustine, “You see the Trinity if you see love.”

Vatican News goes on to remind us that

“1) All prayers in the Church begin in the Name of the Holy Trinity and end glorifying the Trinity.

2) All Sacraments are administered (we are baptized, confirmed, anointed, our sins are forgiven, and our marriage blessed, and our Bishops, priests and deacons ordained) in the name of the Holy Trinity.

3) Where Church bells ring thrice daily, they remind us to pray to the Holy Trinity.

4) We bless ourselves, and the priest blesses us, in the name of the Holy Trinity.”

If God poured love into our hearts, what do we do with that love? Do we share this love with those in our families? Do we reach out to a broader group, the community of people in our parish, those we work with, or teach and learn with? This love of God is not to remain stagnant, but to be shared and thus grown and increased.

The priests at Daylesford Abbey, ordained ministers belonging to the Norbertine community, a religious order founded by St. Norbert, (Norbert of Xanten) have found the secret of God’s love, as they live in a community of prayer, trust, and faith. These Norbertine priests have diverse backgrounds, different gifts and talents, and different areas of interest but they live, share, work and support each other.

Listening to their homilies on Sunday and daily Mass, spending time with them by going on a retreat, visiting and praying at their church and walking the Abbey grounds, making the outdoor Stations of the Cross, even wondering, and exploring if this life may be something to which you are drawn?

The Holy Trinity: Three persons in one God. The Norbertine priests at Daylesford; many persons praying and worshiping one God and living out a life of service in various forms of ministry.

The Holy Trinity! Holy Norbertine priests! Holy People of God! Followers of Jesus reflecting, living, and sharing the love of the Trinity! A joyful solemnity, indeed!

The priests at Daylesford Abbey, ordained ministers belonging to the Norbertine community, a religious order founded by St. Norbert, (Norbert of Xanten) have found the secret of God’s love, as they live in a community of prayer, trust, and faith. These Norbertine priests have diverse backgrounds, different gifts and talents, and different areas of interest but they live, share, work and support each other.

Listening to their homilies on Sunday and daily Mass, spending time with them by going on a retreat, visiting, and praying at their church and walking the Abbey grounds, making the outdoor Stations of the Cross, even wondering, and exploring if this life may be something you are drawn to?

The Holy Trinity: Three persons in one God. The Norbertine priests at Daylesford; many persons praying and worshiping one God and living out a life of service in various forms of ministry.

The Holy Trinity! Holy Norbertine priests! Holy People of God! Followers of Jesus reflecting, living, and sharing the love of the Trinity!  A joyful solemnity, indeed!